A.H.F. DanWesson Bicentenial 2nd Amnd.44 MagDeluxe
Dan Wesson 2nd Amendment commemorative 44 Magnum
New Old Stock Condition
FFL is required
Current Bid
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BuyNow! Price Was
$2,500.00
Starting Bid
$1,950.00
No Reserve!
0 Bids Bid History
Time Left 15 min rule
Item has Ended
7/30/2017 12:24 AM
Item viewed 214 times.
Item 669411120
Location Cherry Hill, NJ 08003
Shipping Buyer pays actual shipping costs for the following option(s): 2nd Day, 3rd Day, Ground
See Item Description
No international shipments
Payment USPS Money Order, Money Order, Certified Check
Checkout Yes
Sales Tax
Seller does not collect sales tax
Inspection/ Return Policy
AS IS - No refund or exchange

The seller of this item assumes all responsibility for this listing. You must contact the seller to resolve any questions or concerns before placing a bid. Payment must be made using U.S. dollars ($) unless otherwise stated in the listing. Firearms may only be shipped to a licensed dealer (FFL Holder). Some listed items may not be legal in every state. Complete your purchase within the law.

Please read the Item Characteristics for important listing details.

The grips of this revolver are made out of real Ivory from mature Elephant Tusks.

Information above was added on 6/27/2017 6:17:32 PM
Description: Year of Issue 1989! Quantity Made: 750! Retail Cost: $5,500.00 Comes With Display Presentation Case With Constitution In Back Side Of Case, Another Large Copy Of The Constitution. Comes With All Documentation. In the 1980s Dan Wesson Arms produced some of the finest, most accurate, and popular large- and medium-frame revolvers ever made in America. In the demanding sport of handgun metallic shooting, where competitors are required to use open sights to knock down life-size, heavy steel (up to 60 pounds) representations of chickens, pigs, turkeys, and desert bighorns out to 200 meters, Dan Wesson revolvers literally owned the ranges. Dan Wesson revolvers regularly captured 70 to 80 percent of the top places in the highest categories of these competitions year after year at local, state, regional, and national matches and at the annual International Championships. Dan Wesson revolvers still hold more records and titles in that sport, than all other makes of revolvers combined. Despite this record of success, however, Dan Wesson was a small company as compared to other famous-name handgun makers, and during the 1990s it fell on hard times. It went through a series of largely unsuccessful financial reorganizations and ownership changes with relocation of factories and erratic production, and it fell pretty much off the firearms industry radar except for die-hard long-range revolver fans. That’s about to change. I’ve been a fan of the Dan Wesson revolver design for many years. I was privileged to know company founder Dan Wesson, as well as his family, and had the opportunity to consult in the development of several classic Dan Wesson models and chamberings. On a cold, wet, miserably dreary day I took out to the range the Dan Wesson Model 44 .44 Magnum and proceeded to shoot a 1.12-inch five-shot group at 50 meters from the eight-inch VH barrel with open sights from a sandbag rest using S&W 240-grain JHP ammo. That would be a good result even with a scoped single-shot pistol. Why do Dan Wesson revolvers have an accuracy edge? Other firearms barrels flex, whip, and vibrate as bullets pass down their bores in discharge. Conventional revolver barrels attach only the breech end of the barrel to the receiver or frame; the other end is left hanging. It doesn’t matter how big, fat, and heavy the forward portion of the barrel may be; the only secure point is the thin-diameter threaded part that screws into the frame. By contrast, the straight, tubular Dan Wesson barrel is held in place at both ends–screwed into the frame at the breech and locked at the muzzle by the enclosing shroud and barrel nut. The result is a more secure foundation, less barrel vibration, and less variation in the flexing of the barrel from round to round. The result, at the longer ranges, where it shows and matters, is superior accuracy and superior ability to withstand continuous heavy-load stress. There are other Dan Wesson design features that the company’s technical staff say contribute to their guns’ accuracy and endurance. One is the width of the barrel/cylinder gap, which can be carefully and precisely controlled–and altered–by carefully screwing the barrel in or out until optimal performance is reached. Another factor is the cylinder/crane assembly that locks shut to the frame by a latch in the crane itself–as opposed to a latch at the rear of the cylinder alone (like Colt) or at the rear of the cylinder and the front of the ejector rod (like a typical S&W). The benefit of the crane-latch system (pioneered by the S&W Triple Lock .44 Special revolvers at the beginning of the century and then abandoned by that firm) is that it holds the crane tightly against the frame in firing. Systems that latch the crane only at the rear or in conjunction with the tip of the ejector rod allow the crane to move slightly away from the frame under stress. This results in variations in chamber alignment with the bore at the moment of truth and loss of consistency in round-to-round accuracy. Sustained use of such latching mechanisms merely increases the amount of play and slop in their system. Still other important ingredients in the accuracy and durability of the Dan Wesson system include the use of a one-piece side-plate-free frame and modular construction on all large-frame big-bore magnum models, broached rifling for more crisp edges to the lands and grooves for better “bite” on the bullet, and “choke bored” barrels. A choke-bored barrel is slightly larger in actual bore diameter at the breech than at the muzzle. This results in an increasingly tight bullet engagement with the rifling as it moves toward the muzzle. By deliberately choke-boring barrels, a manufacturer ensures that a barrel bore will not actually wind up being a little bit bigger at the muzzle than the breech. If it were, the barrel would be “looser” around the bullet the farther along it moved, and rifling stabilization would diminish. The benefit of the crane-latch system (pioneered by the S&W Triple Lock .44 Special revolvers at the beginning of the century and then abandoned by that firm) is that it holds the crane tightly against the frame in firing. Systems that latch the crane only at the rear or in conjunction with the tip of the ejector rod allow the crane to move slightly away from the frame under stress. This results in variations in chamber alignment with the bore at the moment of truth and loss of consistency in round-to-round accuracy. Sustained use of such latching mechanisms merely increases the amount of play and slop in their system. Still other important ingredients in the accuracy and durability of the Dan Wesson system include the use of a one-piece side-plate-free frame and modular construction on all large-frame big-bore magnum models, broached rifling for more crisp edges to the lands and grooves for better “bite” on the bullet, and “choke bored” barrels. A choke-bored barrel is slightly larger in actual bore diameter at the breech than at the muzzle. This results in an increasingly tight bullet engagement with the rifling as it moves toward the muzzle. By deliberately choke-boring barrels, a manufacturer ensures that a barrel bore will not actually wind up being a little bit bigger at the muzzle than the breech. If it were, the barrel would be “looser” around the bullet the farther along it moved, and rifling stabilization would diminish. But no manufacturer other than Dan Wesson has combined all these modern and innovative design elements into one refined revolver package, and the results are obvious. No other revolver manufacturer offers the same level of overall performance confidence with an average store-bought, off-the-shelf, regular-production gun. With the performance comes the versatility, which is also a basic result of the interchangeable-barrel system. Think about it: one gun with as many different barrel lengths and styles as you care to put on it. If you want a multipurpose fixed-barrel revolver, you have no choice but to compromise. If your uses are weighted toward the short side, you have to get a four-incher; if your uses are weighted toward the long side, a six-incher. Barrels that are shorter or longer than those two are special-purpose only and not for “general use.” But with a Dan Wesson, you can get one gun and as many different specific-purpose barrel lengths as you need. No compromises or trade-off choices are necessary. Depending on the caliber you select, available Dan Wesson barrel lengths have run from 21/2 inches to 15 inches.
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Manufacturer
Wesson Firearms
Model
.44 Magnum 10 inch Barrel Bicentennial Revolver
Caliber
.44 Mag.
Barrel Length
10 inch
Capacity
6
Frame Finish
Gold Trigger, Hammer & Cylinder, Gold engraved Barrel
Grips
Engraved on Stimulated Ivory American Historical Foundation Shield.
UPC
 
SKU
 
Mfg Part Number
 
Weight
4.00 Pounds