S$W Highway Patrolman, 357 Mag, Wood, Nickel, Rare
Used Condition
FFL is required
Current Bid
No Bids
BuyNow! Price Was
$1,049.00
Starting Bid
$949.00
No Reserve!
0 Bids Bid History
Time Left 15 min rule
Item has Ended
8/2/2017 10:59 PM
Item 671153154
Location Houston, TX 77065
Shipping
Ground$35.00
See Item Description
No international shipments
Payment Personal Check, Visa / MasterCard, USPS Money Order, Money Order, Certified Check, See Item Description
Checkout Yes
Sales Tax
Seller does not collect sales tax
Inspection/ Return Policy
Unspecified

The seller of this item assumes all responsibility for this listing. You must contact the seller to resolve any questions or concerns before placing a bid. Payment must be made using U.S. dollars ($) unless otherwise stated in the listing. Firearms may only be shipped to a licensed dealer (FFL Holder). Some listed items may not be legal in every state. Complete your purchase within the law.

Please read the Item Characteristics for important listing details.

Smith & Wesson Model 28 “Highway Patrolman,” .357 Magnum, Nickel, Probably 3” Barrel (4” if measurement starts at end of chamber), Wood Grips, Excellent Condition both wood and metal. This revolver is rare because its metal finish was changed to nickel at some time (original 28s were blued). It is also rare because it is stamped “Highway Patrolman,” which means it is an early version, and comparatively fewer were manufactured with this model name. The model was changed to “28” by S&W in 1957. This revolver was manufactured in 1956, 1957, or 1958, being stamped “Highway Patrolman.”

More historical information about the Model 28 follows. The Smith & Wesson (S&W) Model 28, also known as the Highway Patrolman, is an N-frame revolver chambered for the .357 Magnum cartridge, in production from 1954 to 1986. It is a budget version of the S&W Model 27.

The Model 28, also known as the Highway Patrolman, traces its heritage back to the Smith & Wesson Registered Magnum. The Registered Magnum morphed into the Model 27. Law enforcement agencies favored the Model 27, but its high-polish finish and labor-intensive topstrap checkering added expense with no added utility for a police carry gun.

The Model 28 is unusual in that Smith & Wesson removed, rather than added, features to the Model 27 to create it, in order to reduce production costs with no reduction in utility. A classic N frame revolver, the Highway Patrolman is blued, but it is not polished, saving labor costs. The top strap and frame rounds are bead blasted to achieve a matte appearance.

By the early 1950s Smith & Wesson returned to manufacturing many of its pre-World War II models, including the .357 Magnum, the descendant of the famous Registered Magnum. However, the .357 Magnum was more costly than the standard .38 special revolver of the time.

In the late 1940s and the first part of the 1950s Smith & Wesson was the only American gun company manufacturing a .357 magnum revolver. Since the relatively deluxe Model 27 was the only revolver available for this cartridge at the time, police departments, as well as individual officers and private shooters, requested from Smith & Wesson a more strictly utilitarian "budget" .357 magnum revolver. S&W responded with the Highway Patrolman (later renamed the Model 28 in 1957). The manufacturing changes made for a more affordable revolver, though mechanically the Highway Patrolman is the same as the more ornate Model 27. The Model 28 was in production from 1954 through 1986. For most of its production run it was a steady seller with both police officers and civilian shooters.

Layaway 25% down and 15% per month until paid in full. If Buyer remains in good standing at all times during the layaway period, Seller will refund half of all payments made at any time if Buyer changes mind. Or suggest layaway terms to better suit your needs.

Special Note: All reasonable offers will be considered. Feel free to suggest a sales price via the Gunbroker email system. If we agree on a price, DO NOT BID until I change the auction to have a BUY NOW amount equal to the agreed amount. Shipping is additional to the agree BUY NOW amount. Important: (1) All sales must be completed through Gunbroker. (2) Gunbroker richly deserves its fee for the very fine service they provide us all. (3) Do not ask to finish the transaction outside of Gunbroker. If you want to negotiate a Sale Price, do not bid on the item. Rather, contact me using the Gunbroker message (email) system. After we agree to a price, we will coordinate a BUY NOW at the agreed price. (Shipping/insurance cost will be additional to the Sale Price.)

The .357 S&W Magnum (9×33mmR), or simply .357 Magnum, is a revolver cartridge with a .357-inch (9.07 mm) bullet diameter. It was created by Elmer Keith, Phillip B. Sharpe,[5] and D. B. Wesson of firearms manufacturers Smith & Wesson and Winchester. It is based upon Smith & Wesson's earlier .38 Special cartridge. The .357 Magnum cartridge was introduced in 1934, and its use has since become widespread. This cartridge started the "Magnum era" of handgun ammunition. The .357 Magnum cartridge is notable for its highly effective terminal ballistics when used for hunting or defense.

The .357 Magnum was collaboratively developed over a period in the early to mid-1930s by a group of individuals in a direct response to Colt's .38 Super Automatic. At the time, the .38 Super was the only American pistol cartridge capable of defeating automobile cover and the early ballistic vests that were just beginning to emerge in the post-World War I "Gangster Era." Tests at the time revealed that those vests defeated any handgun bullet traveling less than about 1,000 feet per second (300 m/s). Colt's .38 Super Automatic just edged over that velocity and was able to penetrate car doors and vests that bootleggers and gangsters were employing as cover.

Though .38 and .357 would seem to be different diameter chamberings, they are in fact identical, as 0.357 inches (9.07 mm) is the true bullet diameter of the .38 Special cartridge. The .38 Special nomenclature relates to the previous use of heeled bullets (such as the .38 Short Colt), which were the same diameter as the case. Thus, the only external difference in the two cartridges is a slight difference in length, solely for safety purposes.

Much credit for the .357's early development is given to hunter and experimenter Elmer Keith. Keith's early work in loading the .38 Special to increasingly higher-pressure levels was made possible by the availability of heavy, target-shooting-oriented revolvers like the Smith & Wesson .38-44 "Heavy Duty" and "Outdoorsman", .38-caliber revolvers built on .44-caliber frames. The .38-44 HV load used the .38-Special cartridge loaded to a much higher velocity than standard .38-Special ammunition. The .38-44 revolvers were made by using a .44 Special size gun with the barrel bored to accept .357-caliber bullets (the true bullet diameter of the .38 Special) and the cylinder bored to accept .3801–.3809-inch-diameter (9.65–9.67 mm) cartridges (where the name “38 Special” originated). Since the frame, cylinder, and barrel were much stronger than the standard .38 Special components, it was capable of withstanding much higher pressures.

The .38-44 HV round, while no longer available, was in most cases the equal of the later .357 Magnum, which works at more than double the pressure of standard .38 Special. The .357 Magnum addresses the safety issues which earlier cartridges had by lengthening the case by approximately 1/8 inch (3.2 mm), preventing the high-pressure .357 cartridge from chambering (fitting) in a firearm designed for the shorter, lower-pressure .38 Special. Elmer Keith also contributed the Keith-style bullet, which increased the mass of bullet located outside the cartridge, while leaving more room inside the cartridge for powder. The Keith bullet also employed a large, flat meplat, thus enabling rapid energy transfer for greater wounding properties. At the same time, this bullet design does not deform like a hollow point, and as a result achieves greater penetration. These characteristics of the Keith bullet make it very suitable for hunting applications as well as for target shooting.

In order to reassert itself as the leading law-enforcement armament provider, Smith & Wesson developed the .357 Magnum, with D. B. Wesson leading the effort within Smith & Wesson, along with considerable technical assistance from Phillip B. Sharpe, a member of the Technical Division staff of the National Rifle Association. The new round was developed from Smith & Wesson's existing .38 Special round. It used a different powder load, and ultimately the case was extended by 1/8 inch (3.2 mm). The case extension was more a matter of safety than of necessity. Because the .38 Special and the early experimental .357 Magnum cartridges loaded by Keith were identical in physical attributes, it was possible to load an experimental .357 Magnum cartridge into a .38 Special revolver, with potentially disastrous results. Smith & Wesson's solution, of extending the case slightly, made it impossible to chamber the magnum-power round in a gun not designed for the additional pressure. However, both .38 Special and .357 Magnum will chamber in Colt New Army revolvers in .38 Long Colt, due to the straight-walled chambers, but this should not be done under any circumstances, due to dangerous pressure levels, up to three times what the New Army is designed to withstand.

The choice of bullet for the .357 Magnum cartridge varied during its development. During the development at Smith & Wesson, the original Keith bullet was modified slightly, to the form of the Sharpe bullet, which itself was based upon the Keith bullet, but which had 5/6 of the bearing surface of the Keith bullet, Keith bullets typically being made oversized and sized down. Winchester, however, upon experimenting further during the cartridge development, modified the Sharpe-bullet shape slightly, while keeping the Sharpe contour of the bullet. The final choice of bullet was hence based upon the earlier Keith and Sharpe bullets, while additionally having slight differences from both.

This cartridge is regarded by many as an excellent hunting, metallic silhouette and self-defense round. With proper loadings it can also be effective against large or dangerous game, such as bear and ungulates, however many consider the larger magnum calibers to be more appropriate such as the .500 Smith & Wesson, .50 Action Express, .44 Magnum, .454 Casull, .41 Magnum as well as other larger magnum rounds. Comparatively the 357 magnum has less energy than the larger magnum revolver loadings but is smaller in diameter with high velocity allowing for excellent penetration properties. It is a fine small- and medium-game round and is sufficient to hunt deer at reasonable ranges if suitable loadings are used by a competent marksman. For further comparison, the .357 Magnum has a higher velocity at 100 yards (91 m) than its parent .38 Special has at the muzzle. The 357 Magnum's effectiveness on game is similar to that of the .45 Colt, but with a much flatter trajectory due to its higher velocity. It is a very versatile cartridge, and can be used with success for self-defense, plinking, hunting, or target shooting.

Revolvers chambered in .357 Magnum caliber have the significant advantage of also being able to chamber and fire the shorter and less powerful .38 Special cartridge. Compared to the .357 magnum, 38 special is also lower in cost, recoil, noise, and muzzle flash. The ability to also fire the .38 special makes .357 revolvers ideal for novice shooters who are not yet used to firing full-strength .357 loads but do not want the expense of buying a second lower-powered gun to train with. However, .38 Special ammunition should not generally be used with any .357 semiautomatic handgun or rifle, since such firearms require the larger recoil produced by firing a .357 Magnum round to cycle properly.

It has also become popular as a "dual-use" cartridge in short, light rifles like the American Old West lever-actions. In a rifle, the bullet will exit the barrel at about 1,800 feet per second (550 m/s),[14] making it far more versatile than the .30 Carbine or the .32-20 Winchester. In the 1930s, it was found to be very effective against steel car doors and ballistic vests, and metal-penetrating rounds were once popular in the United States among highway patrol and other police organizations. The .357 revolver has been largely replaced by modern, high-capacity semi-automatic pistols for police use, but is still very popular for backup gun use, and among outdoorsmen, security guards, and civilians for hunting, metallic silhouette, target shooting and self-defense. The 9mm Winchester Magnum, which is also known as the 9×29mm, was developed to duplicate the performance of the .357 Magnum in a semi-automatic pistol, [15] as was the 357 SIG cartridge.

Some common performance parameters are shown in the table below for several .357 Magnum loads. Bullet weights ranging from 110 to 180 grains (7.1 to 11.7 g) are common. The 125 grains (8.1 g) jacketed hollow point loads are popular for self-defense, whereas the heavier loads are commonly used for hunting.[citation needed] Loads are available with energies from about 400-700 foot pounds of muzzle energy and can be selected for various applications based on desired use and risk assessments.

The .357 Magnum was a direct competitor with the .38 Super. A comparison follows. In terms of accuracy, the .357 Magnum has at least the same potential for precision shooting as the benchmark .38 Special wadcutter round—indeed, a good .357 Magnum revolver will shoot .38 Special wadcutter ammunition with good results. It is this accuracy and power, and the versatility of also being capable of using less-expensive, milder .38 Special ammunition, that makes a .357 Magnum revolver an excellent gun for many different disciplines, from 20 yards' (18 m) precision shooting to long-range falling-plate events. It is an excellent round for those considering handloading ammunition, as it is economical and consistently performs well.

The .357 Magnum was developed from the earlier .38 Special. This was possible because the .38 Special was originally designed to use black powder, which requires two to five times as much powder, by weight, to produce the same velocity with the same bullet as does the much-more-efficient smokeless powder. Thus the .38 Special has a relatively large bullet case. The 9×19mm Parabellum was introduced the same year (1902) but was originally designed for smokeless powder, and for higher pressures (~39,200 psi (270 MPa)).[citation needed] It therefore produces considerably more energy than the .38, despite its case having less than half the powder capacity. Many .38 Special loads use the same powders, in similar charge weights, but because the case is so much larger, light-target loads with fast-burning powders may only fill the case perhaps 1/8 full. Filling the case with slower-burning powders produces much more power, but also much more pressure; far too much pressure for older, smaller-frame revolvers chambered in .38 Special. It was to accommodate these high-pressure, high-power loads that the longer .357 Magnum, together with the stronger revolvers designed to handle it, were developed.

The .357 SIG that was developed in 1994 was named "357" to highlight its purpose: to duplicate the performance of 125-grain (8.1 g) .357 Magnum loads fired from 4-inch-barreled (100 mm) revolvers, in a cartridge designed to be used in a semi-automatic pistol. Performance is similar to the 9×23mm Winchester. The .357 SIG provided a self-defense cartridge close in performance to a 125 gr .357 Magnum, but from a semi-automatic pistol with greater ammunition capacity.

Additional $35.00 Shipping is to pay for fully insured (insurance is a big part of the cost) FedEx shipping to all states except California, Alaska, Maryland, New Jersey, and Hawaii. In Alaska and Hawaii add $20. In the other states add $15. Shipping will be fully insured, and packaged securely to protect your investment. Please call me, Mike Jackson, phone 346-666-4372 cell “24/7,” if you have any questions.

This is an unusual revolver and somewhat rare as a result, increasing its collector value. The .357 Mag is clearly one of the most famous revolver rounds and its ballistics performance is truly awesome, without the recoil detriments of say the .44 Mag. This specimen is used but in very good to excellent condition. See the many photos to appreciate what a great condition this beautiful revolver is in! You can use the Layaway Option and pay for it as your monthly budget allows. Good luck bidding!!

Seller provided no "Additional Terms of Sale"
Manufacturer
Smith & Wesson
Model
Highway Patrolman (Later Model "28")
Caliber
.357 Mag.
Barrel Length
3 inch
Capacity
6
Frame Finish
Nickel
Grips
Wood
UPC
 
SKU
2012.065  
Mfg Part Number
 
Weight
6.00 Pounds